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Broken Homes May Trigger Schizophrenia

November 15, 2017

A person who comes from a broken home is more likely to suffer from schizophrenia and psychotic illnesses than a person who doesn't, say researchers from London, Cambridge, Nottingham and Trinidad. Psychotic illnesses, say the researchers, may be caused by social adversity.

The study will be published in the journal Psychological Medicine.

The team examined data on 780 people from south London, Bristol and Nottingham (UK), all of whom had signs of a psychotic illness.

Here are some of their findings:

-- People of African/Caribbean origin are nine times more likely to suffer from schizophrenia, compared to the British white population

-- People of just black African origin (not Caribbean) are six times more likely to suffer from schizophrenia, compared to the British white population

-- Being separated from one or both parents for over 12 months raised the chances of having a psychotic illness later in life by 150%

-- 31% of African/Caribbean families split up, compared to 18% of white families (in the UK)

The researchers suggest that the high incidence of psychotic illnesses among the Africa/Caribbean population in the UK is partly due to the experience of social adversity early in life. How social adversity may trigger psychological and biological factors is unknown, they say. The researchers added that further research is needed.

Basically, the thrust of this report indicates that psychotic illnesses may not exist purely because of genetics, but social factors may also play a major role. The researchers discarded drug taking as being a factor. Drug taking levels among blacks and whites in the UK is similar.

It is estimated that about 300,000 people suffer from schizophrenia in the United Kingdom.

"Parental separation, loss and psychosis in different ethnic groups: a case-control study"
CRAIG MORGAN, JAMES KIRKBRIDE, JULIAN LEFF, TOM CRAIG, GERARD HUTCHINSON, KWAME McKENZIE, KEVIN MORGAN, PAOLA DAZZAN, GILLIAN A. DOODY, PETER JONES, ROBIN MURRAY and PAUL FEARON
Psychological Medicine doi:10.1017/S0033291706009330
Click here to see abstract online